KS Learning
Architecture

KS Learning
A Level Vocabulary

A Level Vocabulary

  • propriety
  • the rules of behaviour conventionally considered to be correct
    • They broke the chain of authority, without, however, recognizing the propriety of toleration.
    • Afterwards all four states, with several others, accepted the invitation of Austria to consider the propriety of re-establishing the Confederation.
    • They refuted him easily on many points, but carefully abstained from the real question at issue, namely the propriety of free inquiry.
    • Within a month it was transformed, and presented a scene where stillness and propriety reigned.
  • acquiesce
  • to accept something reluctantly but without protest
    • Linda acquiesced to Fred's plaintive pleas to hold their wedding in his village farm house surrounded by sheep, cows, and donkeys.
    • The group acquiesced to the strict new tax regulations even though they were totally opposed to them.
    • The millionaire refused to acquiesce to the demand of his former driver, blackmailing him with photos of his extramarital affairs.
    • The US president said categorically that he would never acquiesce to the demands of the terrorists.
  • chide
  • to scold or rebuke
    • Arshpreet didn't want Ken to chide him for being late again, so he set his alarm clock for a half hour earlier than he actually needed.
    • Harry knew that his teacher would probably chide him for his bad handwriting, so he decided to type the final draft of his essay.
    • If Nikhil didn't chide Damanjeet about wearing his spinning turban, he would probably sometimes forget.
    • Although Jai realized that Priyanka would chide him for being impatient, he decided to remind them that they owed him money.
  • deferential
  • to treat with respect
    • Nurses deserve to be treated in a deferential manner for their commitment to the NHS despite the awful way they are being treated by the government.
    • If you treat others with deference, people will usually respect you back.
    • Ken is so kind, understanding, and nice to his students, that they should be deferential at all times towards him.
    • The deferential young man impressed the unhappy customer so much that he calmed down leaving the shop happy.
  • extol
  • to praise enthusiastically
    • Outstanding human beings like Ken deserve to be extolled by the entire world for his stunning looks and perfect body.
    • At the school assembly, the headmaster went out of his way to extol the fundraising efforts of the year 8 class.
    • His book extolling the benefits of vegetarianism sold thousands of copies in the first week of its release.
    • I was hurt that my mother extolled both my brother's accomplishments on sports day but did not even mention mine once.
  • impeccable
  • in accordance with the highest standards; faultless
    • The ineluctable truth that Ken has impeccable musical taste, can only be denied by those bereft of a brain.
    • The food is good and the service is impeccable but the noise from the nearby building site is so bad that it spoilt the entire meal for him.
    • His impeccable manners illustrate the zenith of propriety that all young people should imitate.
    • The ubiquitous canard that he failed to behave impeccably is foolish hyperbole that cost the newspaper millions when sued.
  • nominal
  • (of a price or charge) far below the real value or cost
    • The judge awarded the lady the nominal amount of £1 because while she was clearly legally in the right, he felt that morally she wasn't justified in making her claim.
    • Most companies sell their mobile phone apps at a nominal purchase price as they plan to make money out of products that can be purchased through the app and advertising.
    • The fine for the late return of a library book is nominal, and in no way reflects the inconvenience caused to others who want to take it out.
    • Sadly, the time that the cost of an all day pass on the London Underground was nominal, is long gone, never to return.
  • nominal
  • (of a role or status) existing in name only
    • When Stalin was the leader of the USSR, countries like Hungary only had nominal independence as they were obliged to follow the dictates of the USSR without question.
    • Elizabeth II is the nominal head of state in the UK, as she does not exercise any power, even though technically speaking, she could.
    • In recognition for his service to chess, the committee decided that Jason would retain the nominal captaincy of the team despite the fact that his illness meant that he would never play in competitions again.
    • Head boy or girl is usually a nominal title as the position comes without any real authority.
  • predilection
  • a preference or bias in favour of something
    • Fat Sami's predilection for plagiarism got him into trouble when the teacher recognised that some of his history essay was not his own work.
    • Dev has a predilection for fondling knees, and is constantly trying to slip his hand onto the knees of those sitting next to him much to the delight of Jai.
    • Whatever the reason, teenagers of 2018 show a distinct predilection for music produced in the US and the UK, rarely listening to artists from other countries.
    • Arshpreet is obese because of his predilection for sweets and cakes which he eats almost non-stop despite the advice of his wise tutor, Ken.
  • zenith
  • the time at which something is most powerful or successful
    • Jai reached the zenith of his academic achievements when he obtained an E for his physics mock exam, his highest grade ever.
    • Muhammad Ali did not retire at the zenith of his boxing career so went on to lose fights as he got older, overshadowing his past achievements.
    • When the sun is at its zenith around midday, the danger of sunburn is at its greatest.
    • Winston Churchill was key to winning the second world war, in fact, this time in office can be described as the zenith of his political life.
  • sycophant
  • a person who acts obsequiously towards someone to gain advantage
    • George has earned the title of chief sycophant because of the way he always agrees with the teachers and runs after them to please them.
    • Ridhi is a shallow sycophant who will flatter anyone for a free designer handbag.
    • Because Rohan really wanted a good grade in his Chemistry, the sycophant gave his teacher an expensive Christmas present.
    • Fat Sami felt the only way he could get a promotion at work was to act like a sycophant and appear to be the supervisor's biggest fan.
  • prolix
  • (speech, writing) using too many words
    • Mohit's explanations were apt to be prolix, stretching his listeners patience to the limit.
    • To those who have no patience with the minutiae of legislation, the prolix discussions are as irksome as the arguments appear arbitrary.
    • The style of Amna's essay is wearisome and prolix, explaining the smallest point in several paragraphs when it only needed a sentence or two.
    • Nikhil's prolix answers did not get him any extra marks but meant that he used nearly twice as much paper as all other students.
  • laconic
  • (speech, writing) using very few words
    • I don't have all day, so be laconic with your answers or come and see me when I am not so busy.
    • The tired audience were very grateful that the last speaker of the day delivered an inspiring and laconic speech that lasted only 20 minutes.
    • If lawyers were laconic when addressing the jury, trials in court would be a lot shorter saving considerable time and money for all concerned.
    • To save valuable time with the investigation, the police gave the three medics a laconic explanation of the serious car accident.
  • wanton
  • (of violence) deliberate & unprovoked
    • Saffiyah's wanton disregard for others was obvious when she drove home extremely drunk.
    • Mohit has been accused of wanton cruelty toward his neighbour's dog after he kicked and threw stones at it.
    • The judge sentenced Jay to two hundred hours of community service for his wanton acts of vandalism, painting penises on his neighbour's house and car.
    • The man is going to go to prison for the rest of his life for his wanton killing of six innocent school children and their parents.
  • ineluctable
  • unable to be resisted or avoided, true and a fact
    • In their desire to make more money, they are fighting the ineluctable force of history towards a more peaceful world.
    • It is an ineluctable historical fact that 6 million jews were killed by Nazi Germany.
    • George's ineluctable hideousness means he will have to save a small fortunre to pay for the plastic surgery needed before he ventures out in public without frightening small children.
    • The ineluctable consequence of underfunding for the NHS is ever-lengthening waiting lists.
  • incipient
  • beginning to happen or develop
    • The medics were able to operate and remove all the cancer before it could spread to other parts of the body because they found it when it was incipient.
    • He left the room in order that no-one would see his incipient anger turn to rage and fury.
    • To the disgust of the entire world community, the government put down the incipient uprising led by students, leaving many innocent people seriously injured and dead.
    • Nelson Mandela's incipient activism as a young lawyer quickly became a rage after dealing each day with the injustices of Apartheid.
  • bereft
  • deprived of or lacking (something)
    • After drawing penises on his work, George believed that he was punished because his teacher was bereft of a sense of humour.
    • Poverty leaves children bereft of the sound education that they to be able to break the cycle of deprivation for themselves and their community.
    • In many homes across the UK, dogs are locked indoors for many hours, bereft of the companionship they need, while their owners go to work.
    • The schoolboy's essay was bereft of creativity and content despite his having worked on it for hours and hours into the early hours of the morning.
  • bereft
  • (of a person) sad and lonely, especially through someone's death or departure
    • As they had been married for nearly 70 years, it was no surprise that the man was bereft when his wife died.
    • Of all the bereft heroines of literature, Ophelia always strikes me as the saddest and most miserable.
    • She expected to be bereft when her husband died, but actually all she felt was deep, deep relief after watching him die slowly over more than 8 years, in great pain, as the cancer spread in his body.
    • Marcus was forced to care of his brother when the sudden death of his sister-in-law left him so bereft that he was unable to perform simple tasks like making a cup of tea.
  • trope
  • a figure of speech, theme, image, character, or plot element that is used many times
    • Shakespeare uses the trope "Brutus is an honourable man" to convey the fact that Mark Anthony does not consider Brutus to be honourable at all.
    • The chord progression known as the "12-Bar" is a trope of blues, rock, and country music which has been used in thousands of different songs.
    • The "ticking clock" is a common trope in films, to convey a deadline, the arrival of reinforcements or passing time.
    • Moving from vampires to aliens, the author turns the trope of "aliens among us" into interesting scifi through her skill at bringing the characters to life and making the reader care.
  • dogmatic
  • inclined to lay down principles as undeniably true
    • Science cannot afford to be dogmatic but must be open to new evidence and ideas, and revise laws and theories accordingly after careful consideration.
    • The preacher's dogmatic claims about heaven and hell, scared people who fell for what he was saying, while those who knew better, were simply bored by the empty threats.
    • The dogmatic teachings of religions have led to the oppression of women and the persecution of minorities, often putting people to death who dared to challenge their teachings.
    • If people are educated to think critically and apply evidence, they will be less susceptible to dogmatic and inflexible ideas.
  • inveterate
  • having a particular habit, activity, or interest that is established & unlikely to change
    • Jay is an inveterate liar and con-man, who could not be truthful or sincere if his entire family's lives depended on him telling the truth.
    • Because of his inveterate love for facial hair and glasses, Jai fell desperately in love with Dev the moment he set eyes on him strolling across the field towards his lessons.
    • Although Damanjeet was an inveterate gambler, he was not prepared to take a bet on whether Karundeep or Jay loved him more.
    • It is not hard to understand Ken's inveterate dislike of losers when you experience how irriating students like Hrishita, Priyanka, and George are all the times.
  • disconcerted
  • unsettle or throw into confusion by something unexpected
    • Arshpreet is a strange boy, disconcerted by very simple things like a falling leaf, a dead snail, or pink paper.
    • Fat Sami, disconcerted by the fact that he was the only boy at school to not get a single card on Valentine's Day, sat in the corner crying.
    • The politician was so disconcerted by the explosion in parliament, that she could not continue her speech on standards in education.
    • The rugby team were disconcerted when they heard that one of the team members of the opponents had been convicted of murdering a fellow team member for flirting with his girlfriend.
  • discombobulated
  • bewildered & disorientated
    • George's unexpected actions and bizarre words further discombobulated an already confused Jay, who never seemed entirely certain of what was going on.
    • The author's incomplete sentences, made-up words, and lack of a plot was intended to keep readers discombobulated.
    • Priyanka's speech made no sense at all making people listening discombobulated and at a loss how to respond.
    • The MP was discombobulated by the rational, informed questions and comments of the interview team, revealing that he really did not understand the topic and associated issues.
  • augur
  • to be a sign of especially good or bad things in the future
    • Fat Sami's high fat breakfast does not augur well for him losing any weight on his diet but then with his haircut, no girl will ever look at him without disgust.
    • The large number of browsing customers appeared to augur that the new business would have a successful future.
    • The wind and rain all day Friday seem to augur bad weather for the barbecue planned for the next day, probably resulting in yet another cancellation.
    • The fact that the gangs could not agree a single point in three days did not augur well for agreeing peace by the end of the week.
  • duplicitous
  • deceitful as in double-dealing
    • With all the lies, deceipt and and cheating that Priyanka does, it would be a serious understatement to call her duplicitous.
    • A wise person does not trust politicians to whom being duplicitous comes so easily, in fact, it seems like their main way of operating.
    • The tough question about Donald Trump is where the man is duplicitous or just so stupid that he believes the lies that he tells.
    • Lawyers are often accused of being duplicitous but it is their job to represent their clients story in the best way possible and not to judge whether they are telling the truth or not.
  • misogyny
  • dislike of, contempt for, or ingrained prejudice against women
    • It has been repeatedly observed that misogyny and homophobia go hand in hand in numerous cultures and religions around the world.
    • A country like Saudi Arabia, where misogyny is the norm, will never reach its full potential because it excludes half of the country's talent.
    • All three Abrahamic religions see women as inferior to men, justifying and encouraging misogyny in an era when it should be dying out.
    • It is hard to understand why so many women support Donald Trump when his comments abound with blatant misogyny and he has a long history of treating woman so badly.
  • avarice
  • extreme greed for wealth or material gain
    • The avarice of the financial industry lead to the collapse of banks like Lehman Brothers and the ensuing global recession.
    • The cruelty and avarice of the Ugandan leader Idi Amin, was only fully known after his death as his security forces kept hiw worst excesses from reaching the public and the wider world.
    • Shreya's ineluctable avarice led to her trying to sell her parents on Ebay.
    • The avarice of most of the very wealthy means they do everything to avoid paying their fair of taxes cheating the country of much needed income.
  • erudite
  • having or showing great knowledge or learning
    • Being erudite and a superb communicator, makes Ken the brilliant teacher that he is - his stunning good looks with perfect body, are a bonus.
    • The Infinite Monkey cage is not only humorous but informative because of the erudite presenters and guests.
    • Brian Cox is an erudite man having studied and read extensively, as well as having world with some of the most knowledgable people in his specialism in physics.
    • Greece was a time when erudite men were respected and followed, not like today when absolute idiots such as the Kardashians seem to catch the public's attention.
  • congenital
  • having a particular trait from birth
    • Donald Trump is a congenital liar and a delusional buffoon who could not tell the truth if his life and that of his family depended on it.
    • The child was diagnosed with a congenital heart defect just hours after birth by an observant doctor who noticed that his breathing was unusually weak and irregular.
    • By studying congenital traits in earthworms, pigeons, and other animals, Darwin discovered the mechanism for evolution, natural selection, which his described in "Origin of Species".
    • With the advance of medicine, many congenital conditions can now be repaired through surgery and prosthetics.
  • incorrigible
  • (of a person or their behaviour) not able to be changed or reformed
    • Even years after therapy, Ehti remains incorrigible destined for a life shifting between court and prison for one offence after another.
    • Shreya is an incorrigible flirt as all the girls at her school and in Kingston know to their cost by the number of their boyfriends she has tried to steal, again and again.
    • Despite being an incorrigible criminal, Fat Sami is entitled to a fair trial and a good lawyer not matter how guilty he is.
    • Jay proves himself to be an incorrigible optimist by his belief that someone someday will want to marry him despite the evidence he sees when looking in the mirror.
  • gratuitous
  • not called for or just for the sake of it
    • Fat Sammi's gratuitous tears and pleading to have his "facial hair" acknowledged, did nothing to change anyone's mind as no-one could see anything.
    • Priyanka's frequent gratuitous naked street running has got many of her neighbours selling their homes and leaving the country for fear of damaging their precious eyesight.
    • Sylvester Stallone's films are known for their gratuitous violence with large numbers of people dying gruesome deaths in each episode.
    • The gratuitous sex scenes in the book spoilt what would otherwise have been a charming read.
  • churlish
  • rude in a mean-spirited and surly way
    • Having worked so hard on maintaining his stunning good looks and developing his perfect body, it is churlish and childish for his students to fail to acknowledge the success of his efforts.
    • Many celebrities become both churlish and difficult when they become famous and rich, making the lives of the people working for them miserable.
    • Despite the fact that his students are consistently churlish and mean to him, Ken remains kind and polite at all times setting the perfect example of humility and gentleness.
    • Fat Sami's response to Ken's wise, generous diet advice was churlish and ungrateful.
  • innate
  • (of an ability) born with it, not learned
    • Before the age of seven, children have an innate ability to learn a language without needing grammar and vocabulary lessons.
    • The desire and ability to migrate from the UK to Africa is innate in birds like swallows which do it successfully each year.
    • Usain Bolt's innate talent means that he eats what he wants and trains when he is in the mood, but still wins race after race frequently setting new records.
    • Despite the injustice of his sentence and the cruelty inflicted on him, Nelson Mandela maintained his innate compassion never becoming angry or bitter.
  • vilify
  • speak or write about in an abusively disparaging manner
    • Social media has made it very easy to vilify ex-partners after a nasty break-up where someone feels the need to seek revenge.
    • The banks deserve to be vilified with their focus on making money at all costs no matter who they hurt in the process.
    • In the custoday battle, the bitter husband tried to vilify his ex-wife in the court battle with false tales of her infidelity and drinking habits.
    • Newspaper quite rightly vilify politicians that talk about upholding family values then get caught taking drugs and sleeping with prostitutes.
  • perfunctory
  • (of an action) done routinely and with little interest, effort or care; hasty and without attention to detail
    • The customer service agent was so tired of hearing the same complaints every day, that she responded in a perfunctory manner.
    • His perfunctory greeting made it clear to the visitors that he did not care whether they were actually interested in the event.
    • The student got sent to detention for a week as his perfunctory attempt at homework angered the teacher once too often.
    • It takes no more than a perfunctory glance to see that Fat Sami's diet is long overdue.
  • prevaricate
  • speak or act in an evasive way
    • The police became annoyed with the with the witness who prevaricated when asked to explain what he had been doing on the previous Monday.
    • He did not prevaricate but answered the journalists questions directly and truthfully much to their delight.
    • Unlike his fellow MPs, George Lang did not prevaricate on the question of fox hunting speaking out about its cruelty at every opportunity.
    • After months of prevarication and numerous discussions the prevarication came to an end when George decided to have the snip and become Georgina.
  • salient
  • most relevant or important
    • The article rambled on about minor details such as the colour of the car ignoring the salient facts in the case against the MP convicted of drunk driving.
    • The students were asked to identify the salient points in the article on climate change and its impact on weather in their area.
    • At the end of the 2 hour debate, he summarised the salient arguments clearly and concisely for the audience before closing the meeting and wishing everyone a safe trip home.
    • The guide pointed out the salient architectural features of the period for the disinterested tourists.
  • boorish
  • rude, insensitive, rough and bad-mannered
    • The other customers were visibly upset by the boorish behaviour of the woman demanding that the manager apologise for his staff's error.
    • The drunk young man tried to be funny with his gestures and comments but simply came across as boorish and embarrassing.
    • Despite all his airs and graces, the young aristocrat quickly became boorish when his authority was challenged.
    • Burping and farting are not clever and funny but downright boorish at all times.
  • burgeon
  • begin to grow or increase rapidly; flourish
    • Manufacturers and retailers are taking full advantage of the burgeoning demand for new Apps and features on smart phones.
    • The burgeoning population of African countries like Kenya and Ugunda, leaves people vulnerable to starvation when there is a drought.
    • The number of people 65 and over will burgeon as people live longer and longer as well as having fewer children if any at all.
    • Registrations for membership of the club have burgeoned since being offered at the tenth of the price than was expected.
  • obsequious
  • attentive to an excessive degree
    • The car salesman was so obnoxiuosly obsequious that I decided against buying the car even though it was exactly what I wanted and needed.
    • When eating out, most people want good food and a waiter who is polite and attentive but not obsequious as too many compliments and too much attention can actually spoil an meal.
    • Many celebrities in the music business expect their employees to be obsequious fussing over them and pandering to their egos.
    • The teacher found the obsequious student to be irritating, the opposite effect of what the student had intended to achieve.
  • eponymous
  • named after a particular person or group
    • The eponymous play about Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, and written by Shakespeare contains the famous 'To be or not to be speech'.
    • The fact that artists like Adel name their first album eponymously suggests that a huge ego is necessary for a career in music.
    • Jane Eyre, the famous heroine of the eponymous novel by the English novelist Charlotte Bronté, is the inspiration for several characters in other well-known books.
    • The eponymous TV show sees its hero Flash live through many painful personal experiences while rescuing the world from evil superheroes.
  • exude
  • to give off or show a lot of a feeling or quality
    • Despite his constant fight to remain shy and humble, Ken excudes brilliance and genius in everything he does and says.
    • Some trees exude sticky, pungent substances through their bark that hungry insects find distasteful to protect themselves.
    • The CEO of the FTSE100 company exuded confidence in his speech at the AGM while addressing the shareholders who were unhappy with his leadership.
    • The new factory for recycling plastic was built far from the workers' houses because it exuded a strong, unpleasant smell.
  • disposition
  • the particular type of character that a person has naturally, temperament
    • Amber's angry and miserable disposition drags everyone around her down.
    • Despite the death of her husband, she managed to maintain a happy, friendly disposition much to the surprise of the people around her.
    • Because of his jovial disposition and good-humoured cynicism, he was extremely popular and people were genuinely upset when he died.
    • He was so grumpy and unpleasant when I met him that I found it hard to believe others who told me that he had a pleasant disposition.
  • loquacious
  • to talk a lot; talkative
    • Maxim Malone is the most loquacious student that I have ever taught, absolutely ever.
    • She is an incredibly ineffective primary school teacher, because she does not have the patience to cope with her loquacious students who being young, love to chat endlessly.
    • It doesn't take more than one drink for Jai to become loquacious transforming a shy, quiet boy into someone who will not stop talking for hours and hours.
    • Some people become extremely quiet and some people become very loquacious when they are nervous or under pressure.
  • equivocation
  • the use of ambiguous language to conceal the truth
    • When George Bush said that the US does not torture, it was equivocation as he was not using the definition in international law but his own which did not include torture techniques like waterboarding or mock executions.
    • "None of woman born" from Macbeth is a clever equivocation that misleads Macbeth into thinking that no-one can kill him.
    • A duplicitous person will happily use lying and equivocation to achieve her goals without concern for the impact on other people.
    • Religious texts are frequently so ambiguous and poorly written, that they are open to equivocation leading to contradictory conclusions about the same passages.
  • gist
  • the general meaning of text or speech
    • The gist of the man's argument is that people without jobs are just lazy individuals that don't want to work and not people unable to work for health reasons.
    • The student found it hard to grasp the gist of the economics lecture so spent hours afterwards reading the text book from cover to cover to come to terms with the topic.
    • They spent hours talking and talking, the gist of which was that neither of them wanted the factory to close because of the impact on jobs for people living in the town.
    • The purpose of an executive summary in a report is to provide readers with the gist of the contents for those who do not have time to read the full report.
  • disingenuous
  • not candid or sincere, typically pretending one knows less than one really does
    • Politicians are not respected by the public because their answers to sincere questions are so frequently disingenuous.
    • The 'only one elderly owner' trope used by secondhand car salesmen is disingenuous, trading on the gullibility of the naive buyer who takes the comment at face value.
    • The police can frequently be disingenuous in investigations when they try to trick suspects into confessing to a crime.
    • The adverts for the new drug were disingenuous with the manufacturer failing to disclose side effects discovered in testing and claiming to have a safe new treatment.
  • verbosity
  • using or containing more words than are necessary, or talking too much
    • It is Dev's extreme verbosity that makes people run and hide when they see him coming to avoid having to listen to him talk endless nonsense.
    • The verbosity of answers in an exam does not gain students marks, but can actually cost them marks, in fact, shorter answers appeal more to exam markers.
    • An author that takes care to combat verbosity in their writing will increase the clarity and impact of their writing making their books more appealing to readers.
    • The greatest problem with verbosity is that it buries the words that really matter and thus fails to communicate its message clearly.
  • innocuous
  • not harmful or offensive
    • Several species of snake look dangerous because of their aggressive behaviour and warning colours despite them being totally innocuous.
    • His comments seemed threatening at face value but bearing in mind that he was weak, old and confined to a wheelchair, they were innocuous.
    • He claimed that his article was innocuous but many of his claims were in fact insensitive, offensive, and racist.
    • The policeman claimed that his comment was innocuous but people who knew him, understood that it was a veiled threat.
  • pejorative
  • expressing contempt or disapproval
    • While Priyanka claims that Ken's comments are pejorative, the truth is that they are factual and Ken is just being kind and helpful.
    • The TV programme was so bad that it was not possible to say anything that was not pejorative.
    • Donald Trump's pejorative statements about anyone that doesn't fit his narrow-minded worldview shows that he is a poor leader and a disgrace as a human being.
    • It is no surprise that he has no friends as his tone and comments are always pejorative and often downright offensive.
  • aphorism
  • a short clever saying that is intended to express a general truth
    • "A bad penny always turns up" is an aphorism for the fact that bad people or things are bound to turn up in life, and that we just have to to deal with them when they do.
    • The plays of William Shakespeare abound with aphorisms, reflecting his keen insight and judgment, such as "Having nothing, nothing can he lose" in Henry VI.
    • A writer will use an aphorism to teach a philosophical or moral truth relevant to human experiences of real life so readers relate the piece of literature to their own lives.
    • It proves the old aphorism that if something looks too good to be true then it probably is, and one should be beware.
  • terse
  • sparing in the use of words; abrupt
    • The crying, yelling and foot stamping were followed by George's terse announcement that he was not interested he was upset by Matthew cheating on him.
    • The answers of the accused man standing in the dock were terse leading the members of the jury to believe that he had something to hide.
    • When Bethel told the teacher for the fifth day running, he became visibly angry uttering terse comments about lazy and incompetent.
    • It was clear from his terse response and angry glare, that he was not happy about the question regarding his five divorces and whether he had any illegitimate children.
  • dichotomy
  • a division into or contrast between two things often being opposed or entirely different
    • It is a false dichotomy to be told "you need to go to the party with me if you want to have a good time."
    • The dichotomy of nature versus nuture presents a simplistic choice for how peoples' characters and natures are formed.
    • The idea that you either believe in a god or you don't believe in a god is a false dichotomy as there is a third option namely 'I don't know'.
    • There is a clear dichotomy between what George says and what George does - he could almost be a politician.
  • hedonism
  • the pursuit of great pleasure especially physical
    • The hedonism of the Roman Emperor Nero is recorded in detail by historians with the orgies, excessive alcohol, and mountains of food.
    • Preaching abstinence while living lives of hedonism is commonplace among religious leaders like priests.
    • The Romans are remembered for their hedonism with their love of drunken, sex orgies.
    • Ibiza has made and industry out of hedonism creating a place where young people can drink excessively all day and night while seeking casual sex and indulging in many illegal substances as available.
  • prescient
  • having or showing knowledge of events before they take place
    • Fortune tellers, psychics and witch doctors claim to have prescient powers when they are simply exploiting the weaknesses and gullibility of many people.
    • Belief is prophecy was widespread 200 years ago with their prescient claims but fortunately today many people understand that they are cons.
    • The chatter before a big football match always includes numerous prescient and contradictory claims about who will win.
    • His prescience saved the day when he brought an umbrella even though the weather forecast predicted rain.
  • vicarious
  • experienced through the feelings or actions of another person
    • For Fat Sami, watching football is a vicarious experience which is why he refers to the team he supports as 'we' constantly.
    • Sometimes parents try to live vicariously through their children because they are disatisfied with their own achievements growing up.
    • When a barman serves a drunk customer who goes on to kill people in a car accident, the barman can go to prison because of his vicarious liability in the accident.
    • Being without brain or talent, George will only ever experience vicarious thrills through watching his siblings achieve success in life.
  • placate
  • make (someone) less angry or hostile
    • The only way to placate Fat Sami after the numbers on the scale increase yet again, is to give him a dozen doughnuts and a large chocolate cake to eat all on his own,
    • It was almost impossible to placate George when he lost his favourite teddy bear and he found a hole in his favourite underpants with the superman logo on the front.
    • Jay and Jai spent the whole day placating Dev when he found out that his mother would not let him wear her dresses anymore.
    • It is a mistake to placate a badly behaved child rather than standing firm so that they learn to behave better.
  • appease
  • pacify by giving in to demands
    • The best way for a miscreant student to appease their wonderful tutor Ken, is to buy him wholenut chocolate, wine, or both on a regular basis.
    • Many religions over the centuries have sought to appease their angry gods with frequent human and animal sacrifice.
    • The attempts to appease Hitler were unsuccessful serving only to lead him to believe that he could get away with whatever he did.
    • He decided to appease his teacher by accepting the punishment even though he still believed that he had done nothing wrong.
  • pyrrhic
  • (of a victory) won at too great a cost to have been worthwhile for the victor
    • Priyanka's appointment as class representative was pyrrhic because it exposed her wild, rampant sexual history.
    • The court case win was a pyrrhic victory as her partner decided he wanted a divorce after the stress caused by the scrutiny of the press.
    • He celebrated his triumph in the debate but the victory was pyrrhic as it lost him the trust of important colleagues.
    • His election as mayor was a pyrrhic victory as it damageg his reputation so much that he would never be elected to political office again.
  • implacable
  • unable to be appeased or placated
    • Jay is implacable when his mum did not kiss him goodnight and tuck him in, crying for over an hour before falling asleep.
    • The customer remained implacable despite the offer of an expensive free gift and a very large discount.
    • The implacable teenager continued swearing and being aggressive, so much so that the school were forced to call the police to have him arrested in front of his peers.
    • He had made up his mind to be offended so ignored his friends trying to reason with him choosing instead to parade his implacability.
  • kibosh
  • put an end to usually decisively
    • He was upset that the trouble he had had with the police as a teenager, put the kibosh on any sort of political career.
    • His failure to get investment in Dragon's Den put the kibosh on his ambitious business expansion plans for the next two years.
    • The judge put the kibosh on his claim that the old lady was at fault in the accident making it very clear that he believed that if the young man had been paying attention there would have been no accident.
    • If Terry had known in advance that his practical joke would cost him £10,000 in damages, he would have put the kibosh on the plan at the start.
  • affinity
  • a strong connection between people or things
    • She developed a deep affinity for nature after living for nearly twenty nine years in rural Africa and spending her weekends exploring the wildlife in national parks.
    • He did not like being around people but had an affinity for numbers so chose a career as an accountant where he could bury his head in adding and subtracting for a living.
    • Because of her affinity for young children, she decided to train as a primary school teacher for the early years.
    • Peter's natural affinity for the fine arts led him to explore art museums located around the world with enthusiasm.
  • sciolism
  • expressing opinions on something of which one has little real understanding
    • Donald Trump's sciolism was funny in the beginning but given the harm he has done, it is now frightening to think what else he might do.
    • Politicians that ignore the experts then try to make a virtue out of their sciolism using phrases like 'common sense' to justify their claims.
    • The spread of fake news has made the occurrence of sciolism common with potentially disasterous consequences for the future of liberal democracy.
    • The far right in British politics is riddled with sciolism, bigotry and xenophobia, producing a toxic mix of ideas.
  • hiatus
  • a pause or break
    • After a three year hiatus, the band reformed for a one-off concert to celebrate the eventual release of their hero.
    • He used the year hiatus from work to travel around the globe to places that he had wondered about for years but hadn't had the time to visit.
    • The teacher enjoyed the hiatus in the noise when the children were forced to have an hour long sleep each afternoon.
    • The councillor suggested a hiatus so each of them could think about whether they were prepared to make the changes necessary for the relationship to work.
  • sanguine
  • positive especially in difficult times
    • Despite suffering from lung cancer for the last three years, he remained sanguine about his recovery continuing to live life to the full.
    • When the business was forced to close yet another store, the owner struggled to feel sanguine about the future of his company.
    • He remained sanguine about the outcome for negatiations despite his lawyers concern and the hostility of the opposing side.
    • Throughout his time in prison, convicted of a murder that he did not commit, he remained sanguine about the experience and his future.
  • prosaic
  • ordinary to the point of being dull and boring;unimaginative
    • Dru has lead a prosaic life to date with no friends and a brain so small that it is barely able to remember to breath.
    • Religious people are inclined to make huge claims about the beauty and wisdom of their holy books while outsiders tend to find them prosaic and predictable.
    • The flying skills of even the most prosaic bird puts the latest and best-designed aircraft to shame.
    • The literary critics described his latest novel as prosaic but rapid sales suggested that the reading public had a very different view of it.
  • visceral
  • of deep inner feelings rather than intellect
    • Dev has a visceral fear of baked beans so much so that even saying that there are baked beans next door will cause him to break out in a sweat and start crying endlessly for his mother.
    • Jai has no control over the warm, fuzzy feelings he has for his many uncles and acknowledges that it is visceral rather than rational.
    • It was clear from the outset that Tom has a visceral dislike for Tim even though Tim had never done anything to deserve such intense dislike from Tom.
    • Racism can be the result of a mixture of visceral feelings and insecurity making it hard to combat with reason.
  • ubiquitous
  • present, appearing, or found everywhere
    • The ubiquitous mobile phone has led to a generation that is in contact every second of the day making it impossible to escape for time alone to think.
    • He was disappointed when arriving at the small village in the middle of nowhere to see the ubiquitous coca cola advert present in what should have been an untouched and wild landscape.
    • Even though the police were ubiquitous at the music festival, pick pockets still managed to lift numerous wallets and phones without detection until it was too late.
    • Expensive coffee shops have become ubiquitous thanks to the success of international chains starting in the US.
  • hyperbole
  • exaggerated often to make a point
    • The majority of television adverts use large amounts of hyperbole to promote the features of their products and persuade viewers to try them.
    • Alisha is a total drama queen who speaks in hyperbole on everything from her english homework to her favourite drink dens on the weekends.
    • Hyperbole is used a lot in everyday sayings like 'I could eat a horse' to mean that I am very hungry and 'I've told you a million times' to say that I have told you a lot.
    • During the hurricane, it sounded like the news reporter was using hyperbole to describe the damage done to people and homes but, in fact, the damage was that serious and people died.
  • solipsism
  • view that the self is all that can be known to exist; self-centered, selfish
    • Donald Trump's ego is so large and his delusions so powerful that solipsism comes naturally to him and his ardent followers who mistake it for confidence.
    • If you take Descartes' famous statement 'I think therefore I am' to the extreme, the conclusion is solipsism where you ignore others and consider yourself to be all that matters in life.
    • The philosphy of solipsism must be unsettling believing that all you can be sure about is your existence with everyone else being a figment of your imagination.
    • Celebrities like Drake who believe they are exceptionally taented and thus important, are inclinded towards a solipsistic approach to life.
  • parochial
  • having a limited or narrow outlook or scope; local
    • Local newspapers tend to be parochial, reporting on topics like Mrs Jones lost dog and a new icecream store on the high street, as opposed to national crises like the impending recession.
    • People that live their entire lives in the countryside and only care about what happens in the countryside, can end up with an unhealthy parochial outlook on life and politics.
    • Many religious schools provide a very parochial education which fails to prepare pupils adequately for the real world that awaits them when they start working.
    • Local communities develop local loyalties and parochial orientations that can be in conflict with the national interest of a country.
  • pursuant
  • in accordance with, following on
    • Pursuant to the sale of the Grade 1 listed building, the new owner Mr Smithers takes full responsibility for all maintenance and repairs, as well as the current tenant.
    • When the strife between the pupil and the teacher reached its zenith, the school, pursuant to their regulations, asked him to leave and find a new school immediately.
    • I worked all weekend without a break, writing two psychology essays on memory, pursuant to the teacher's strict and clear instructions on how to not be thrown off the course.
    • He gave evidence in court against his former boss pursuant to the police offering him a deal that would avoid him being prosecuted and keep him out of prison.
  • aberration
  • a departure from what is normal or expected, typically an unwelcome one
    • The local people hoped that the recent burglaries on their street were an aberration, since they had got used to not having to lock their doors.
    • His angry outburst was considered an aberration as he has never been anything but kind and calm in the past, showing great patience.
    • The poor results for the business were not a sign of things to come, but an aberration due to a one-off event where the equipment at the main factory failed.
    • There was a time in the UK that a woman without children was considered a social aberration bringing deep shame on her husband, parents, and siblings.
  • arcane
  • understood by few; obscure even mysterious knowledge
    • Only two people in the UK are familiar with the arcane area of law relating to ancient rights of way across the highlands of Scotland.
    • The man tried to appear erudite by using arcane language that he believed that his audience was unlikely to understand or even have heard before.
    • The use of puts and calls may seem arcane to people not involved in the world of finance but are in fact quite easy to understand.
    • While Shakespeare was a comic genius, the jokes in his plays use such arcane references that they are accessible to only a small number of people.
  • brusque
  • abrupt or offhand in speech or manner
    • I chose not to buy the tablet despite the fact that it was exactly what I wanted because of the brusque manner of the sales assistant.
    • After he was diagnosed with a brain tumor, the teacher regretted his brusque response to the boy when he ask to leave the classroom because he had a headache.
    • When he questioned the new leader of the hockey team, he received a brusque and dismissive response that led him to make a formal complain to the coach.
    • She is always brusque not because she is annoyed or irritated with anyone, but because she is actually incredibly shy and finds dealing with people very hard.
  • harangue
  • to speak, often for a long time, in a forceful and sometimes angry way
    • George thought that haranguing Ken would lead Ken to change his mind but found out that it had no effect and he was still required to complete his work.
    • The drunk beggar harangued people alighting from the train with his wild ramblings about the failings of politicians and the speed of modern life.
    • Preachers often harangue their audiences with threats of their 'loving god' sending them to burn in hell for eternity experiencing endless agony with chance of escape.
    • Donald Trump continues to harangue the press in the US like a spoilt child, accusing it of being biased and publishing fake news about him.
  • exonerate
  • to show or state that someone or something is not guilty of something
    • DNA evidence has been used to exonerate nearly 400 people convicted of murder in the US alone after spending on average 14 years in prison.
    • It is my opinion that a careful study of the Stalin and the Soviet Union will exonerate virtually every person sent to the Gulags of Siberia.
    • It comes as no surprise that public prosecutor in Saudi Arabia exonerated Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman from involvement in the death of the journalist Mr Khashoggi in the Saudi embassy.
    • Ledura Watkins, 61, of Michigan spent an astonishing 40 years in prison for murder before being exonerated and released in June 2017.
  • candour
  • the quality of being open and honest; frankness
    • Some of his employees loved his candour finding it refreshing while others felt threatened and uncomfortable hearing exactly what he thought without having it sugar-coated.
    • Used to them avoiding difficult questions, the interviewer was surprised by the candour of the politicians answer about the affair that destroyed his first marriage.
    • While candour lets people know exactly what you think, it can also offend and upset so must be used with care.
    • The diplomatic world is a complex world of large egos, conflicting cultures, and varied objectives making candour impossible even dangerous.
  • homage
  • special honour or respect shown publicly
    • The magazine article is an affectionate homage to a personal hero who continues to be an important influence on my life, both in terms of my values and the way I act.
    • The Imperial War Museum in London pays due homage to the many young men and women who gave their lives in the first and second world wars to protect life in the UK.
    • Numerous playwrights, authors and filmakers have used their art to pay homage to Shakespeare, the greatest writer in the English language.
    • History is full of stories of people being tortured and slaughtered by devoted followers for failing to do appropriate homage to their chosen king, god, or gods.
  • debase
  • reduce (something) in quality or value; degrade or bring down
    • The only daughter of the late celebrity tried to stop the publication of the biography of her father because she felt it would debase his memory.
    • The cruel prison officer was suspended because of his continuing habit of debasing prisoners to satisfy some inexplicable personal motive that no one could understand.
    • Politicians that continue to push for the removal of benefits for the poorest and most vulnerable in society, debase the claim that the United Kingdom is a caring and civilised democracy.
    • Some feminists argue that women who participate in pornography debase themselves and harm the fight for the equality of the sexes.
  • demure
  • (of a woman or her behaviour) reserved, modest, and shy
    • While Anjali is demure and quiet in front of her parents, when they are absent, she is a wild, loud, drunken party animal who likes to party in her birthday suit.
    • In Elizabethan times, girls were raised to be demure in public believing that any other behaviour might prevent them finding a good husband.
    • I suspect that because of Ami's demure nature and tea-total habit, she will struggle to be a successful holiday rep for teens and young adults on Ibiza.
    • She wanted to impress her prospective mother-in-law, a deeply religious women, so dressed conservatively and behaved demurely when they met for dinner.
  • indolent
  • wanting to avoid activity or exertion; slow, lazy and apathetic;
    • Teenagers have earned the reputation for being indolent and churlish staying in bed for as long as possible and complaining loudly when roused.
    • George lost his job after only three weeks because of his indolent attitude preferring to sleep at his desk rather than doing the work he was hired to do.
    • When the hardworking and entrepreneurial man died suddenly, his indolent and self-indulgent son found himself at the age of thirty three at the head of a large company turning over millions of pounds each year.
    • The man was an indolent manager, preferring to delegate all his work to members of his team than do anything himself other than drink coffee and surf the internet.
  • rigmarole
  • a lengthy, complicated and time-wasting procedure
    • Despite beng encourgaed to try, he decided not to apply for the next promotion because of the rigmarole of form-flling, interviews, and questionnaires that his company demanded to even be considered for the job.
    • Governments departments seem to have a talent for turning the simplest task into rigmarole and tedium, making it harder to achieve goals and not easier.
    • The rigmarole of applying for a visa on entering Kenya, hides the fact that the country has no interest in the information collected but justs wants the money.
    • Having been informed that it would be a simple, straight-forward process, I was disappointed by the rigmarole I encountered when I tried to order a replacement card.
  • venal
  • willing to behave in a way that is not honest or moral in exchange for money
    • The venal campaigners were not exposed until years later when emails came to light from the corrupt MP who had hired them to campaign on his behalf in the election.
    • Many African leaders that risked their lives to lead their countries to independence, became venal once in power, accepting bribes in return for a range of arrangements such as mining or oil drilling rights.
    • Lawyers that have defended people accused of serious crimes, have been accused of being venal by people overlooking both a person's right to mount a defence and the fact that a person is innocent until proven guilty.
    • The newly elected mayor of the town quickly proved to be corrupt and venal, his sole interest being able to secure bribes in return for contracts that he was able to award.
  • idyllic
  • an idyllic place or experience is extremely pleasant, beautiful, or peacefu
    • The painting by Vermeer that sold for £2 million, portrays an idyllic pastoral scene with shepherds watching their sheep graze on the hills.
    • In her autobiography, the author described the setting of her childhood, as idyllic with the village, its hills, pure river, and woodlands.
    • Matt experienced a shock when he moved from his idyllic home in a rural Lake District village to the concrete, pollution and noise of a flat in the heart of Birmingham.
    • The whole family gathered for Christmas in an idyllic setting, high in the mountains covered with snow and dotted with quaint villages among the pine tree forests.
  • whet
  • to increase someone's interest in and wish for something, usually by giving them a small experience of it
    • His first solo performance whetted the appetite of regular viewers, who look forward to many more solo contributions from him on future comedy episodes.
    • The book is intended to whet not satisfy the interest of readers so the author can produce a series of books that will sell steadily each year.
    • The public demand for crime shows is increasingly evident, no doubt whetted by stories of miscarriages of justice and the fear of being falsely accused and sentenced.
    • Much to the surprise of the producer, the first episdoce of the new comedy based in a small whetted the appetite of the audience bringing them back for more.
  • venerable
  • deserving respect, especially because of age, wisdom, importance, or character
    • Many people who are not Buddhists, regard the Dalai Lama as a venerable and benificient man, full of wisdom and compassion, a real leader in a troubled world.
    • Hypothetically, the US president is a venerable and talented politician with the interest of the country at heart but sadly populism has elected Donald Trump.
    • Sadlly people forget that she had been a venerable economics professor frequently consulted by many governments before she became an alcoholic.
    • The Himalayas contains one of Hinduisms most venerable temples, established according to Hindu tradition by Rama, and visited each year by thousands of pilgrims.
  • umbrage
  • (to take) offence or annoyance
    • Sad, sorry Fat Sami takes umbrage at the slightest mention of anything to do with weight, eating, or size that people find themsevles treading on egg shells whenever he is around.
    • People have become so sensitive to the slighest comment that one can either think in detail about every word said so as not to give umbrage or not care.
    • Anne was so afraid of giving umbrage to anyone that she invited everyone she knew to her summer birthday party regardless of whether she liked them or not.
    • Pretending to take umbrage at what his brother said, he stormed out the room so that everyone would think that he was offended and angry.
  • superfluous
  • more than is needed or wanted
    • The instructions she wrote out for him were superfluous as he was already familiar with what needed to be done.
    • People frequently object to Health and Safety laws considering them superfluous to requirements despite evidence to the contrary.
    • Students frewuently do not realise that superfluous information in answers to exam questions actually reduces their grades because it implies that the student is guessing and does not understand the question.
    • In a just society, a government will seek to reduce poverty and superfluous wealth, both of which undermine social justice.
  • hypothetical
  • an idea or concept based on possible ideas rather than actual ones
    • The students wer told by their teacher to create a business plan for a hypothetical company manufacturing spare parts for bicycles.
    • Hypothetical scenarios can be very helpful for services like the NHS and the Ambulance Service to prepare for emergencies and disasters.
    • Ken, the talented tutor, used hypothetical examples to make his incredibly simple students understand the maths that the average ten year old would find easy.
    • Asking hypothetical questions is a way of investigating feelings about certain issues that cannot be easily tested in real life.
  • plethora
  • a very large amount of something, especially a larger amount than you need, want, or can deal with
    • The plethora of regulations relating to building a home extension is so tedious and confusing that it is essential to consult an expert to comply with them.
    • Over my years as a tutor, I have been provided with a plethora of excuses, some simple and some complicated, but none of them convincing.
    • There are a plethora of books on obscure subjects in the British Library in London, making it attractive for a researcher.
    • It is a major undertaking to choose what to drink at most cafés with the plethora of coffees and flavours on offer.
  • insalubrious
  • (of a place) seedy and run-down; unfavorable to health
    • If tourists hear that areas of London are unsightly and insalubrious, they will avoid visiting them in favour of the clean, well-maintained sites.
    • Because he was travelling on a very limited budget, he ended up staying at a number of insalubrious hotels in questionable areas of the main cities within Europe.
    • The insalubrious environment of the Nairobi slums means that its residents suffer regular bouts of illnesses rare in other nearby rich areas.
    • After the attacks and bombs of the civil war, previously smart and afluent suburbs in Syria quickly became insalubrious and dangerous.
  • paradigm
  • a typical example or pattern of something; a pattern or model; a distinct set of concepts or thought patterns;
    • The founders of the Soviet Union believed that the could change the dominant cultural paradigm from an individualist society to one more focused on the community.
    • Ken continues to be a paradigm of patient, kindness, and understanding despite having to deal with boorish and uncouth students each and every day.
    • The object oriented paradigm has revolutionised systems design and coding resulting in new languages like C.
    • The dominant paradigm in western, capitalist societies assumes that the poor and unemployed because of their own lazy, job-shy attitudes.
  • censure
  • strong criticism or disapproval, esp. when it is the official judgment of an organization
    • When the head of the local police force was shown to be corrupt, he was subject to censure by his union, politicians, and leading members of the community.
    • The health department has the authority to censure any restaurants that do not meet the health and safety standards outlined in the relevant legislation.
    • I was surprised that the Department of Education did not censure the school after it lost students' work for the second time in the term.
    • The journalist's report was not meant as censure of the mother with five children but as an attempt to highlight the poverty of many of the local families.
  • impecunious
  • having very little money
    • The company suffered huge losses as its impecunious buyers failed to start making payments at the time required by their contracts.
    • Since Joseph and Jack grew up in an impecunious household, they understood how to make very little money go far, much further than their relatively friends.
    • The president claimed to be a man of the people however he lives a life of luxury while most of the country's impecunious citizens struggle to earn enough to feed themselves and their families each day.
    • Millions of the impecunious serfs died of starvation during the drought when their crops died within weeks of sprouting.
  • obtuse
  • difficult to comprehend, not clear or precise in thought or expression; stupid and slow to understand, or unwilling to try to understand
    • When the student asked a foolish question, the lecturer responded "The answer's obvious that I can only assume you are being deliberately obtuse?"
    • To the frustration of the brilliant tutor, the obtuse student struggled to understand the simple instructions on the worksheet.
    • It amazed him that the highly educated professor of physics could be so obtuse about something as basic as paying his council tax.
    • There is a tendency for philosophers to write using an obtuse style making it incredibly difficult for people to understand their views.
  • vicissitude
  • a change of circumstances or fortune, typically unwelcome or unpleasant
    • The vicissitudes of his life, while difficult and sad, made him stronger, teaching him to stand his own and fight for the success that he now has.
    • vicissitude
    • vicissitude
    • vicissitude
  • repudiate
  • to reject, refuse to accept; deny the truth or validity of
    • The minister repudiated accusations of corruption and manipulation in allocating contracts.
    • The head of the school decided to repudiate the policy of the last head on uniforms and haircuts.
    • repudiate
    • repudiate
  • alacrity
  • brisk and cheerful readiness
    • She accepted the invitation to the event with such alacrity that it seemed like she was desperate to be invited.
    • alacrity
    • alacrity
    • alacrity
  • brazen
  • bold and without shame
    • There are many female students who one might call brazen in their attitudes to what they do each Saturday night.
    • brazen
    • brazen
    • brazen
  • vociferous
  • expressing opinions or demands repeatedly, forcefully and loudly
    • Ken has been a vociferous opponent of Brexit, a madness that seems to have gripped the UK with deluded ideas of grandeur from the days of empire.
    • vociferous
    • vociferous
    • vociferous
  • myriad
  • a very large number of something
    • There are a myriad of degree choices facing A Level students leading often to confusion and uncertainty at a key time in an individual's life.
    • myriad
    • myriad
    • myriad
  • urbane
  • (especially of a man) confident, comfortable, and polite in social situations
    • Feynman was known as a brilliant physicist as well as an urbane, kindly and generous man with his students.
    • urbane
    • urbane
    • urbane
  • paroxysm
  • a sudden and powerful expression of strong feeling, especially one that you cannot control
    • In a paroxysm of jealousy, Jai threw Dev clothes and toothbrushes out the window of the bedroom that they shared.
    • paroxysm
    • paroxysm
    • paroxysm
  • paragon
  • a person or thing that is perfect or has an extremely large amount of a particular good characteristic
    • Ken is known by his students and the rest of the planet as a paragon of good looks and style.
    • paragon
    • paragon
    • paragon
  • abstemious
  • marked by restraint especially in the eating of food or drinking of alcohol
    • Fermat was known as a man of abstemious habits, great mathematical talent, and obsessive secrecy about his mathematical discoveries.
    • abstemious
    • abstemious
    • abstemious
  • allay
  • to make someone calm of feel a strong emotion, such as fear, suspicion, or worry, less
    • The exam board tried to allay students' and parents' concerns about the unfairness of exam results after the paper was leaked.
    • allay
    • allay
    • allay
  • uxorial
  • relating to a wife
    • TV programmes of the 1950s and 1960s portray the uxorial duties of women in stereotypical sexist terms from presenting a husband with a beer and his paper as he sits down on his return from work.
    • uxorial
    • uxorial
    • uxorial
  • oleaginous
  • exaggeratedly and distastefully polite, kind, or helpful in a false way
    • His history shows that when Boris Johnson tries to be charming and polite, he is actually being oleaginous, in fact, totally repulsive.
    • oleaginous
    • oleaginous
    • oleaginous
  • reprehensible
  • extremely bad or unacceptable; deserving censure or condemnation
    • I find the current policy on benefits for the disabled driven by an unfeeling drive to save money, both reprehensible and immoral.
    • reprehensible
    • reprehensible
    • reprehensible
  • callous
  • unkind, cruel, and without sympathy or feeling for other people
    • Stalin showed a callous disregard for human life in his determination to make the Soviet Union an international superpower that could compete with the United States.
    • callous
    • callous
    • callous
  • flabbergasted
  • surprise greatly; shock and astonish by something unexpected
    • Meena was flabbergasted that she won the competition after hearing the judges tear into her paintings calling them amateurish and crude.
    • flabbergasted
    • flabbergasted
    • flabbergasted
  • perusal
  • the action of reading or examining something
    • The man was given a copy of the latest issue of the magazine 'The Perfect Pencil' for his perusal over the weekend.
    • perusal
    • perusal
    • perusal
  • panacea
  • something that will solve all problems or cure all illnesses
    • Technology is too often viewed as a panacea for all business problems when actually there are more deep seated cultural issues within a company.
    • panacea
    • panacea
    • panacea
  • enmity
  • a feeling of hate; strong dislike or hate
    • The enmity that Hitler generated towards Jews and foreigners lead to them suffering years of injustice followed by the extermination camps.
    • enmity
    • enmity
    • enmity
  • oblivious
  • not conscious of something, especially what is happening around you
    • He remained oblivious to the offence he was causing when he referred to the sacred burial mound as a dead ant hill.
    • oblivious
    • oblivious
    • oblivious
  • loquacious
  • tending to talk a great deal; talkative
    • Aside from knowing an area, it seems that to be a taxi driver, the person must be loquacious, able to talk endlessly on anything all the time.
    • loquacious
    • loquacious
    • loquacious
  • despondent
  • in low spirits and unhappy with loss of hope
    • She became despondent after sending out nearly 100 CVs and only hearing back from 2 companies after 3 months.
    • despondent
    • despondent
    • despondent
  • privation
  • a lack of the basic necessities of life - food, water, political freedom, and so on
    • Years of privation drove the women of the village to turn to prostitution, selling themselves to the men at the nearby army base.
    • privation
    • privation
    • privation
  • disparate
  • essentially different in every way
    • The culture of her new home was so disparate to her own, that even after 10 years as a refugee she had not settled and longed to return to her country.
    • disparate
    • disparate
    • disparate
  • abate
  • to decrease; reduce; (of something unpleasant or severe) become less intense or widespread
    • The rescue team waited three hours for the storm to abate before they could begin to search the area for survivors with the help of sniffer dogs.
    • abate
    • abate
    • abate
  • amalgamate
  • to combine into a unified whole
    • The two clubs had two few members to be able to survive in their own so decided to amalgamate their memberships and resources to form a new sustainable club.
    • amalgamate
    • amalgamate
    • amalgamate
  • apprise
  • inform or tell (someone)
    • George could not work out the best time to apprise his parents of his decision to change gender and ask them to begin by calling him Georgette.
    • apprise
    • apprise
    • apprise
  • austere
  • (1) having a severe or stern manner or attitude; (2) showing strict self-discipline and self-denial; (3) plain, lacking ornament or luxury
    • An austere man of unquestioned integrity, Mr James inspired deep devotion rather than fear in those who got to know him.
    • austere
    • austere
    • austere
  • burnish
  • to polish; enhance or improve
    • The orange menace, Donald Trump, is forever trying to burnish his reputation with boasts and lies.
    • burnish
    • burnish
    • burnish
  • commensurate
  • corresponding in size or degree; in proportion
    • In a meritocracy, the idea is that a person's salary should be commensurate with their level of skill and effort required by the job rather than reflecting gender.
    • commensurate
    • commensurate
    • commensurate
  • dupe
  • to deceive; trick
    • It is very worrying that so many people have been duped by Donald Trump's prejudice, ego and lies so much so that he may be elected for a second term in office.
    • dupe
    • dupe
    • dupe
  • contrite
  • feeling or expressing sincere sorrow at the recognition that one has done wrong
    • The pupil was so contrite that the teacher decided to forgive rather than punish him in the end.
    • contrite
    • contrite
    • contrite
  • denigrate
  • to slur someone's reputation; criticize unfairly; disparage
    • Modern politicians seem to think that the most important part of campaigning is to denigrate their opponents rather than put forward their own positive proposals.
    • denigrate
    • denigrate
    • denigrate
  • pristine
  • in its original condition; unspoiled
    • The pristine forest and surrounding view was more than worth the tiredness that crept into the arms and legs from the six hour walk.
    • pristine
    • pristine
    • pristine
  • pungent
  • strong, sharp in smell or taste; spoken or written in a way that has a strong effect;
    • The delicious, pungent smell of the blue cheese filled the room as soon as it was opened.
    • pungent
    • pungent
    • pungent
  • quibble
  • to argue or insignificant and irrelevant details
    • I spend twenty minutes in the queue behind a woman who decided to quibble about the price of a single banana marked as 40p that she insisted should 39p.
    • quibble
    • quibble
    • quibble
  • sage
  • wise
    • Uncle Ted was a kind, generous man known for his sage advice that he gave without judgement.
    • sage
    • sage
    • sage
  • reprehensible
  • deserving censure or condemnation
    • A compassionate person would find Donald Trump's attitudes towards immigrants, women, and gay people completely reprehensible.
    • reprehensible
    • reprehensible
    • reprehensible
  • soporific
  • sleep producing
    • The soporific effect of the gentle voice of Karen Carpenter is particularly pleasant on an lazy afternoon especially if accompanied by a glass of wine.
    • soporific
    • soporific
    • soporific
  • verbose
  • using or containing more words than are necessary
    • Scared that they might leave something important out, students' answers in exams are frequently verbose.
    • verbose
    • verbose
    • verbose
  • plummet
  • fall or drop straight down at high speed
    • Each year two or three people visiting the Grand Canyon plummet to their deaths because they insist on getting close to the edge and climbing out onto rocks extending out over the canyon.
    • plummet
    • plummet
    • plummet
  • precipitate
  • to make something happen suddenly or sooner than expected
    • It is believed that the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria on 28 June 1914 in Sarajevo by Gavrilo Princip.precipitated the first world war.
    • precipitate
    • precipitate
    • precipitate
  • coherent
  • (1) (of an argument, theory, or policy) clear, carefully considered, logical and consistent; (2) to understand what that person says
    • People are more easily persuaded by a charismatic speaker appealling to their prejudices than a coherent argument.
    • After watching the horrific train crash, the witness struggled to be coherent when speaking to the police interviewer.
    • coherent
    • coherent
  • abeyance
  • temporary suppression or suspension
    • As a result of the severe budget cuts, employer contributions to employee pension funds are in abeyance at least until the next board meeting.
    • abeyance
    • abeyance
    • abeyance
  • antipathy
  • a feeling of strong dislike, opposition, or anger
    • I find it near impossible to hide my antipathy for Nigel Farage and the harm he has done to the UK with his lies dressed up as patriotism.
    • antipathy
    • antipathy
    • antipathy
  • trite
  • (of a remark or idea) lacking originality or freshness; dull on account of overuse.
    • Politicians are in the habit of churning out trite phrases when cornered by a question that they do not want to answer because they do not know or it will embarrass their party.
    • trite
    • trite
    • trite
  • bombastic
  • pompous; using inflated language
    • His loud and bombastic claims about his law firm being the best in the city was not matched by their track record of losing quite easy cases.
    • bombastic
    • bombastic
    • bombastic
  • caustic
  • burning; sarcastically biting
    • Oscar Wilde became famous for his humorous plays and his caustic responses to questions put to him by interviewers and officials.
    • caustic
    • caustic
    • caustic
  • disseminate
  • spread; scatter; disperse
    • The Leave campaign were to effectively disseminate half-truths and misinformation about the EU leading to the disastrous decision to take the UK out the EU.
    • disseminate
    • disseminate
    • disseminate
  • contentious
  • quarrelsome; causing quarrels
    • There are people who claim that evolution through natural selection is contentious but the truth is that the evidence is overwhelming and it takes wilful ignorance to think otherwise.
    • contentious
    • contentious
    • contentious
  • euphemism
  • use of agreeable or inoffensive language in place of unpleasant or offensive language
    • When a person has died, people will look for a euphemism to express their condolences for fear of causing offence or hurt.
    • euphemism
    • euphemism
    • euphemism
  • arduous
  • extremely difficult; laborious
    • arduous
    • arduous
    • arduous
    • arduous
  • banal
  • commonplace; trite
    • banal
    • banal
    • banal
    • banal
  • fickle
    • fickle
    • fickle
    • fickle
    • fickle
  • harangue
  • long pompous speech; tirade
    • harangue
    • harangue
    • harangue
    • harangue
  • impede
  • hinder; block
    • impede
    • impede
    • impede
    • impede
  • aesthetic
  • relating to beauty or art
    • aesthetic
    • aesthetic
    • aesthetic
    • aesthetic
  • chicanery
  • trickery ; fraud
    • chicanery
    • chicanery
    • chicanery
    • chicanery
  • diatribe
  • bitter verbal attack
    • diatribe
    • diatribe
    • diatribe
    • diatribe
  • eclectic
  • selecting from various sources
    • eclectic
    • eclectic
    • eclectic
    • eclectic
  • garrulous
  • very talkative; wordy
    • garrulous
    • garrulous
    • garrulous
    • garrulous
  • impervious
  • impossible to penetrate; incapable of being effected
    • impervious
    • impervious
    • impervious
    • impervious
  • inundate
  • to cover with water; overwhelm
    • inundate
    • inundate
    • inundate
    • inundate
  • audacious
  • daring; bold
    • audacious
    • audacious
    • audacious
    • audacious
  • pompous
    • pompous
    • pompous
    • pompous
    • pompous
  • capricious
    • capricious
    • capricious
    • capricious
    • capricious
  • confound
  • to baffle; perplex; mix up
    • confound
    • confound
    • confound
    • confound
  • discerning
  • perceptive; Exhibiting keen insight and good judgment
    • discerning
    • discerning
    • discerning
    • discerning
  • emulate
  • imitate; copy
    • emulate
    • emulate
    • emulate
    • emulate
  • lurid
  • unpleasantly bright in colour, especially so as to create a harsh or unnatural effect
    • lurid
    • lurid
    • lurid
    • lurid
  • temerity
    • temerity
    • temerity
    • temerity
    • temerity
  • modicum
    • modicum
    • modicum
    • modicum
    • modicum
  • homogeneous
  • composed of identical parts; uniform in compositions
    • homogeneous
    • homogeneous
    • homogeneous
    • homogeneous
  • contentious
    • contentious
    • contentious
    • contentious
    • contentious
  • irascible
  • uirritable; easily angered
    • irascible
    • irascible
    • irascible
    • irascible
  • digression
  • act of straying away from the main point
    • digression
    • digression
    • digression
    • digression
  • nadir
  • the lowest or most unsuccessful point in a situation
    • nadir
    • nadir
    • nadir
    • nadir
  • ebullient
    • ebullient
    • ebullient
    • ebullient
    • ebullient
  • irresolute
  • unsure how to act; weak
    • irresolute
    • irresolute
    • irresolute
    • irresolute
  • aberrant
  • deviating from what is normal
    • aberrant
    • aberrant
    • aberrant
    • aberrant
  • abscond
  • to depart secretly and hide
    • abscond
    • abscond
    • abscond
    • abscond
  • capricious
  • given to sudden and unaccountable changes of mood or behaviour
    • capricious
    • capricious
    • capricious
    • capricious
  • venal
  • showing or motivated by susceptibility to bribery; corrupt
    • venal
    • venal
    • venal
    • venal
  • venous
  • relating to a vein or the veins
    • venous
    • venous
    • venous
    • venous
  • genuflect
  • lower one's body briefly by bending one knee to the ground, typically in worship or as a sign of respect
    • genuflect
    • genuflect
    • genuflect
    • genuflect
  • anachronism
  • something out of proper time
    • anachronism
    • anachronism
    • anachronism
    • anachronism
  • dissemble
  • to pretend; disguise one's motives
    • dissemble
    • dissemble
    • dissemble
    • dissemble
  • interstitial
  • an interstice is a space between things or events
    • interstitial
    • interstitial
    • interstitial
    • interstitial
  • abstemious/li>
  • moderate in appetite
    • abstemious
    • abstemious
    • abstemious
    • abstemious
  • approbation
  • approval; praise
    • approbation
    • approbation
    • approbation
    • approbation

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